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STEPS TO CAREER SUCCESS

1) Learn more about yourself via Career Assessments:

2) Learn more about career options that match your interests through watching career videos, taking related classes, participating in PVCC clubs and after school activities, talking with professionals/networking, finding a mentor and/or job shadowing experiences.  Here are some good career/labor market resources:

3) Create your introduction/professional documents (resume, cover/thank you letters, LinkedIn, etc.) to help you land interviews/jobs.

4) Get experience through volunteering, interning or even temporary employment.  These are easier ways to gain access to employers which often lead to long term employment.

  • Volunteering – search by area of interest on United Way
  • Interning – check back.
  • Temporary employment
  • Job Searching

5) Decide whether your career target is a good fit.  If not, consider repeating these steps since finding a great career path is often a process.

 

You can go through h this with the help of your Career Coach or School Counselor .  Sign up HERE to meet with them.

Ever thought about Job Corps???

Fredericksburg – Job Corps Information Session

Job Corps Logo

Job Corps is the nation’s largest career technical training and education program for young people from 16 through 24 years of age that qualify as low income. A voluntary program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, Job Corps provides eligible young men and women with an opportunity to gain the experience they need to begin a career or advance to higher education. Job Corps has no cost to its students or their families.

Job Corps offers hands-on training in more than 100 career technical areas, including: automotive and machine repair, construction, finance and business services, health care, hospitality, information technology, manufacturing, renewable resources, and many more. All training programs are aligned with industry certifications and are designed to meet the requirements of today’s careers.

Job Corps also offers the opportunity to earn a high school diploma or a GED for those youth who don’t have either. For youth who already have a high school diploma, Job Corps can help them prepare for college through partnerships with local colleges. Resources are also available for English Language Learners.

To learn more about Job Corps and begin the admissions process, plan to attend this information session:

Phone: (540) 322-5781
Websitewww.jobcorps.gov

Address:

Workforce Development Center
10304 Spotsylvania Ave., Suite 100
Fredericksburg, VA  22407

Locality:
Fredericksburg
Type of Event:
Job Corps Information Sessions

Program Oppurtunites!!!!

 Program Opportunities

NASA Opportunities for Students

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) provides the following STEM opportunities for free to all Virginia students:

Virginia Space Coast Scholars (VSCS)-Program for 10th grade students focusing on the missions flown or managed by NASA Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, with a Summer Academy program at NASA Wallops Flight Facility.  For more information, visit Virginia Space Coast Scholars

Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars (VASTS)- Program for 11th and 12th grade students focusing on NASA’s human spaceflight missions and the Journey to Mars with an online course with a Summer Academy program at NASA Langley Research Center.  Students can earn up to 4 free dual enrollment credits.  For more information, visit VASTS

Virginia Earth System Science Scholars (VESSS)-Program for 11th or 12th grade students, VESSS is an interactive, on-line Earth System Science Course featuring NASA scientific research and data. The students can earn up to 5 transferable, free dual enrollment college credits and can also compete to attend a Summer Academy program at NASA Langley Research Center.  For more information, visit VESSS

 

The Society of Women Engineers at the University of Virginia

Are you interested in learning about engineering or pursuing an engineering career?  Apply for your place at The Society of Women Engineers High School Visitation Program on November 21, 2018. Deadline to apply is October 22, 2018.  This program is designed to give young women the opportunity to learn about the different fields in engineering and the engineering curriculum at the University of Virginia. For more information, visit Society of Women Engineers

 

University of Virginia’s Multicultural Overnight Visit Experience (MOVE)

The University of Richmond is looking for high-achieving seniors who self-identify as a historically underrepresented population or are interested in issues of diversity and inclusion to further their mission to create a community of diverse scholars committed to academic excellence. While the program is open to all students, priority is given to underrepresented populations during the selection process. Students and their families will have the opportunity to experience the cultural diversity of Richmond, while getting a perspective of life as a potential student.  If interested, fill out Interest Form by October 5, 2018.

 

Science & Engineering Apprenticeship Program (SEAP)

The application for the Science & Engineering Apprenticeship Program has officially opened. The deadline to submit application, transcripts and letters of recommendation is October 31, 2018 @ 6 PM EST.  If you have any questions, email seap@asee.org or call (202)649-3833.  For the application, visit SEAP Application

 

University of Dayton

The University of Dayton is offering open house events for families to tour their beautiful campus, learn about admissions and financial aid, and discover experiential learning opportunities.  The open house events will be held on September 30 and November 11, 12-4.  For more information, visit Open House or call 800-UD-PRIDE (800-837-7433).

 

Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University is taking applications for their Diversity Overnight, November 11 and 12.  Applications are due October 1.  Diversity Overnight is designed for high schools seniors from diverse backgrounds to get an in-depth look at opportunities available to them.  For more information, visit Diversity Overnight

 

 

 

 

 

 

Career Exploration Resources

The Vault – A definitive guide to thousands of careers
What can I do with this major? – A list of career paths sorted by common majors
Mynextmove – Explore possibilities in health care, match your skills
Bureau of Labor Statistics – An encyclopedia of careers; find out about different roles, education requirements, salaries, and more
Occupational Information Network – Search occupations, industries, and skills

Physical Therapist Assistants

What do they do?
Assist physical therapists in providing physical therapy treatments and procedures. May, in accordance with State laws, assist in the development of treatment plans, carry out routine functions, document the progress of treatment, and modify specific treatments in accordance with patient status and within the scope of treatment plans established by a physical therapist. Generally requires formal training.

Will there be jobs?

This occupation is expected to grow much faster than average.

What are typical wages for this career?

 

How do I start?
Associate’s Degree
No work experience
No on-the-job training
Programs that can prepare you:
Video Of this Career

https://www.careeronestop.org/Toolkit/Careers/Occupations/occupation-profile.aspx?keyword=Physical%20Therapist%20Assistants&onetcode=31202100&location=US

 

Source: www.careeronestop.org

Community Colleges Are Great Options!!

Why Community College Is a Better Option Than You Think

Avoiding paying room and board for college (if you live at home instead of renting an apartment since there usually aren’t dorms at community colleges) is another cost-saving measure.

In 2017-18, the average tuition and fees for a full-time student at public two-year institutions nationally was $3,570, compared with $9,970 (in-state) at public four-year colleges and $34,740 at private universities, according to the College Board. After federal financial aid, 71 percent of community college students pay less than $1,000. Some states are beginning to make community college free through specific scholarship programs: New York, Oregon, Tennessee, and most recently, Rhode Island.

You could be one of millions of students attending college practically for free, if you consider attending a community college.

A Good Option for Exploring Different Majors or Choosing a Career Off the Bat

Community college can be an especially good fit if you don’t know what career you want to pursue. At a community college, you can take a variety of courses at a low cost in different academic disciplines to help you figure out what you want to ultimately major in, if you plan to transfer.

What community colleges are known for is offering programs that are connected to the needs of the local economy. Associate degrees can be earned to enter the workforce right away after two years of study. Popular degrees like dental hygiene ($72,910 average salary), diagnostic medical sonography ($68,970 average salary), nursing (to become a registered nurse at an average starting salary of $66,640) are all available. If you want to start a career sooner than the average college graduate, a community college may be a good fit.

Guaranteed Admission and Seamless Transfer to Four-Year Colleges

Don’t like taking tests? Community colleges don’t require entrance exams like the SAT. Nearly anyone can take a class at a community college simply by registering for class.

If you know you may want to transfer to a state university, you can take many of the four-year required courses at a community college cheaper than at a state university. Most community colleges have agreements with state universities to help make a transfer seamless and not lose college credits in the process.

A great advantage of attending some community colleges is guaranteed transfer to a state university when certain requirements are met (usually a GPA requirement). States like Arizona, California, Hawaii, Florida, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, and Virginia have agreements in which community college students are guaranteed admission to state universities, if they meet the requirements.

For example, Northern Virginia Community College has a guaranteed admission agreement to 40 universities, if a certain GPA and other requirements are met. To show how this is advantageous, here is a scenario: say you want to attend the University of Virginia(UVA), one of the top public universities in the country. If you attended a community college for the first two years and earned a certain GPA, you would be automatically guaranteed admission to UVA, but you would pay $5,497 per year for the first two years of college instead of $30,490 per year for the same first two years. You’ve just saved nearly $50,000 ($49,986 to be exact)!

And you might not even have to leave your community college campus to transfer to another institution to earn your bachelor’s degree. FSU@Mass Bay — a partnership between Framingham State University (FSU) and Massachusetts Bay Community College, both in the Boston area — enables students to stay at the community college to finish a bachelor’s degree with FSU professors who come to the Mass Bay campus. In Texas, the Lone Star College System has agreements with several universities that offer bachelor’s and master’s degree programs on two of their community college campuses designated as Learning Centers — so you could “transfer” and stay in the local area or even the same campus to earn a bachelor’s degree. Innovative programs like these are popping up, so pay attention to the local degree programs in your area.

You can also potentially transfer to a private college or university — even an Ivy League institution like Yale or Harvard — after attending a community college. Did you know that Eileen Collins, the first woman astronaut to command a space shuttle mission, attended a community college? The sky is the limit!

A Solid Education — and Often Flexible Scheduling

Community college courses are taught by professors who have the same educational background as professors who teach at four-year colleges and universities. In fact, at many universities, students are taught by teaching assistants who are graduate students rather than professors with graduate degrees. The rigor in a community college class is oftentimes the same as another nearby institution. What is attractive to many students is that many community colleges have classes at more flexible times than a typical college. In addition to daytime classes, community colleges usually offer many evening classes as well as classes on weekends and online and sometimes hybrid classes in which you take part of the course in a classroom and part of the course online.

Services Comparable to a Typical College

Just like a four-year college, community college has services to help students succeed, including career services, academic assistance like tutoring and writing centers, clubs, honors program, specialized internships with local employers, and even study abroad.

Student life on a community college can be bustling despite not living on campus like at a four-year college. For instance, in South Florida, Miami Dade College, the country’s largest community college, manages the Miami International Film Festival. And in California, RCC Marching Tigers or “Hollywood’s Band” is the marching band of Riverside City College that has appeared in parades such as the Tournament of Roses Parade and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade as well as in movies and on television.

Get a Jump Start on College in High School with Dual Enrollment

Did you know that you can earn college credits while you are still in high school? Nationwide 15% of all community college students are still in high school, according to a recent report.

Dual enrollment, or taking college classes while still in high school, can save you money if credits are transferred when you enroll in college. It can also allow you to decide whether or not you would like to attend a community college or apply to four-year colleges. Whatever you decide, consider your local college options—including community colleges—in your college search. You may find the right place for you and pay a lot less!

Find a community college in your state.

Pharmacy Technicians

 

Image result for pharmacy technician jobs

Quick Facts: Pharmacy Technicians
2016 Median Pay $30,920 per year
$14.86 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training Moderate-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 2014 372,500
Job Outlook, 2014-24 9% (Faster than average)
Employment Change, 2014-24 34,700

 

What Pharmacy Technicians Do

Pharmacy technicians help pharmacists dispense prescription medication to customers or health professionals.

Work Environment

Pharmacy technicians work in pharmacies, including those found in grocery and drug stores, and in hospitals. Most work full time, but many work part time.

How to Become a Pharmacy Technician

Becoming a pharmacy technician usually requires earning a high school diploma or the equivalent. Pharmacy technicians typically learn through on-the-job training, or they may complete a postsecondary education program. Most states regulate pharmacy technicians, which is a process that may require passing an exam or completing a formal education or training program.

For more information about accredited pharmacy technician programs, visit

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

For more information about state licensure laws, contact individual state Boards of Pharmacy, or visit

National Association of Boards of Pharmacy

For more information about certification, visit

Pharmacy Technician Certification Board

National Healthcareer Association

O*NET

Pharmacy Technicians